The leader of the Yazidi (Ezidi) community, Mir Tahsin Said Ali Beg, died aged 86 in Germany, according to supreme spiritual council yezidi , on Monday.

supreme spiritual council yezidi said in a post on his Facebook account that Mir [Prince] Tahsin died on Monday (January 28) in Hanover, Germany after a long illness. It was reported last week that he had been hospitalized.

“With deep sorrow and sadness, we announce the death of the emir of the Ezidis in the world,” the post said.

The Yazidi community will hold a three-day mourning ceremony in Hanover, Germany, before transferring the body of Beg to Iraq where he will be buried, Beg’s eldest son, Hazim, told Ezidi 24 on Sunday.

Mir Tahsin was born on August 15, 1933 in Baadre sub-district in Shekhan district, southeast of Duhok. After the death of his father in 1944, he became the Yazidi Mir.

He later went to Britain and lived in London between 1976 and 1981, after which he returned to Iraq.

Mir Tahsin joined the Kurdish Aylul Revolution against Iraqi government in 1970. He had already experienced imprisonment under the Iraqi regime a decade earlier.

He survived two attempts on his life in 1992 and 2003. He is survived by eight sons and three daughters.

On August 3, 2014, Islamic State group has captured most parts of Sinjar district in northwest Iraq, a home to around 400,000 Yazidis, after Massoud Barzani’s KDP peshmerga forces withdrew from the area without a fight leaving behind the Yazidi civilians to IS killing and genocide.

Thousands of yazidi families fled to Mount Sinjar, where they were trapped in it and suffered from significant lack of water and food, killing and abduction of thousands of Yazidis as well as rape and captivity of thousands of women.

More than 6,800 Yazidis were kidnapped, of which 4,300 either escaped or were bought as slaves, while 2,500 remain missing, according to reports.

According to Human Rights organizations, thousands of Yazidi women and girls have been forced to marry or been sold into sexual slavery by the IS jihadists.

In August 2018, the Yazidis representative in the Iraqi Kurdistan’s Ministry of Religious Affairs and Endowments disclosed that 1,102 Yazidis remain missing.

Some 600,000 Yazidis live in villages in Iraqi Kurdistan region and in Kurdish areas outside Kurdistan region in around Mosul in Nineveh province, with additional communities in Transcaucasia, Armenia, Georgia, Turkey and Syria. Since the 1990s, the Yazidis have emigrated to Europe, especially to Germany.

There are almost 1.5 million Yazidis worldwide.